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Tudor Outfit- Part 2

Things are not going smoothly, to say the least. Remember the tear in the back of the bodice that needed fixed? I went to check the seam and found a place on the inside where the seam was coming apart...then another...and a place where the skirt wasn't fully attached...and then a spot where the lining and outer fabric seams weren't lining up...and a gap where the "stomacher" part in the front didn't sit against the skirt, but left a gap.

In short, the dress was a mess and with fraying fabric and needing to take it all apart, well, it started to get worse the more I picked the seams apart and I finally just separated the skirt from the bodice and tossed the bodice. Unfortunately there isn't enough leftover fabric to re-cut the bodice, so I put the skirt away for future use and checked my pattern for fabric requirements.

10 yards of 45" wide fabric. That's a lot, and I do not have 10 yards of fabric lying around, so it'll be out the fabric store for that later. In the meantime I did pull out new fabric from my stash for the kirtle. I think a nice mellow mustard cotton for the body (interlined with canvas, of course), and a neckline in salmon shot-silk will work just fine.

Naturally I'm wondering if my one-week goal might not be a little ambitious at this point; but in the meantime there is the Gray Elizabethan Mens outfit to work on...

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